Wednesday, February 19, 2020

Gratitude psychology


Gratitude is an attitude of appreciation experienced as a pleasant feeling with thoughts about good people, experiences, things, or benefits. Gratitude also includes behavioral responses such as a smile and an expression of thankfulness.

Gratitude is associated with indicators of better health such as lower blood pressure, longer and more refreshing sleep, and better self-care. Grateful people report less aches and pains.

High levels of gratitude are correlated with other positive emotions. People with high levels of gratitude feel more alert, joyful, optimistic, and happy.

High levels of gratitude are linked to better social relationships characterized by forgiveness, generosity, compassion, and helpfulness. People high in gratitude feel less lonely and tend to be more outgoing.

Several researchers are associated with gratitude science.

Robert Emmons is the leading expert. He is professor at the University of California, Davis. He has published many articles and books on the subject.

Michael McCullough, Professor of Psychology, University of Miami

See also the names in the references below.


Read more about gratitude, which is chapter 4 in Living Well available on AMAZON and other fine booksellers in many countries.














Related Posts

How to measure gratitude

Grateful People: The Psychology of Gratitude 

         *Big 12 features of Gratitude
         *How to develop gratitude - journals and more

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Some Gratitude References


Algoe, S.B. & Stanton, A.L. (2012). Gratitude when it is needed most: Social functions of gratitude in women with metastatic breast cancer. Emotion, 12, 163-168. DOI: 10.1037/a0024024

Emmons, R. A., & Crumpler, C. A. (2000). Gratitude as a human strength: Appraising the evidence. Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology, 19, 56-69.

Emmons, R. A., & Kneezel, T. T.(2005). Giving thanks: Spiritual and religious correlates of gratitude. Journal of Psychology and Christianity, 24, 140-148.

Emmons, R. A., & McCullough, M. E. (2003). Counting blessings versus burdens: Experimental studies of gratitude and subjective well-being in daily life. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 84, 377-389.

Froh, J. J., Bono, G., & Emmons, R. A. (2010). Being grateful is beyond good manners: Gratitude and motivation to contribute to society among early adolescents. Motivation and Emotion, 34, 144-157.
Froh, J., Sefick, W. J., & Emmons, R. A. (2008). Counting blessings in early adolescents: An experimental study of gratitude and subjective well-being.  Journal of School  Psychology, 46, 213-233.

Kashdan, T.B., Mishra, A., Breen, W. E., & Froh, J.J. (2009). Gender differences in gratitude: Examining appraisals, narratives, the willingness to express emotions, and changes in psychological needs. Journal of Personality, 77, 691-730. DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-6494.2009.00562.x

McCullough, M. E., Emmons, R. A., & Tsang, J. (2002). The grateful disposition: A conceptual and empirical topography. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 82-112-127.
 
Rash, J.A., Matsuba, M.K., & Prkachin, K.M. (2011). Gratitude and well-being: Who benefits the most from a gratitude intervention? Applied psychology: Health and well-being, 3, 350-369. DOI: 10.1111/j.1758-0854.2011.01058.x

Toepfer, S.M., Cichy, K., & Peters, P. (2012). Letters of gratitude: Further evidence for author benefits. Journal of Happiness Studies, 13, 187-201. DOI: 10.1007/s10902-011-9257-7

Toussaint, L. & Friedman, P. (2009). Forgiveness, gratitude, and well-geing: The mediating role of affect and beliefs. Journal of Happiness Studies, 10, 635-654. DOI: 10.1007/s10902-008-9111-8

Tsang, J., Ashleigh, S., & Carlisle, R.D. (2012). An experimental test of the relationship between religion and gratitude. Psychology of Religion and Spirituality, 4, 40-55.  DOI: 10.1037/a0025632

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